Agriculture and farming in Pakistan

Pakistan

Number of agricultural advertisements in Pakistan:6 ads
Number of agricultural events in Pakistan:0 events
Number of agricultural companies in Pakistan:1919 companies



Agriculture in Pakistan

Pakistan is a country located in southern Asia. The region now straddling the border of present-day Pakistan and Afghanistan is one of the most torn regions of the world. The area has seen the arrival and departure of a number of civilizations, through invasions and migrations: Alexander’s period, the January Uprising of 1857 by the Sepoys, the establishment of British Raj, and all the way through to the Partition of British Raj in 1947. Pakistan is bordered by the India-administered Kashmir to the east, Afghanistan to the northwest, and the nation of Iran and the whole of Balochistan to the west. To the south lies the Arabian Sea. Pakistan boasts a rich cultural heritage, with major influences from Indian and Iranian civilizations. The population of Pakistan is mixed and consists of numerous ethnic groups and religions, including the Punjabis, Pashtuns, Sindhis, Muhajirs (immigrants from India during partition), Kashmiris, and Baloch people. Urdu and English are the official languages of Pakistan, with Punjabi and Sindhi being widely spoken as well. The country’s economy is considered to be heavily dependent on agriculture, with cotton being one of its major cash crops. Other important industries are textiles, clothing and footwear manufacturing, cement production, and oil extraction. However, due to a number of issues, such as political instability, low levels of foreign investment, and corruption, Pakistan’s economy has been struggling in recent years. Pakistan is a federal parliamentary republic and has a population of over 207 million people, making it the sixth most populous country in the world. The capital city is Islamabad and the largest city is Karachi. Despite its many issues, Pakistan remains a popular tourist destination, known for its lush green valleys, mountains, and rivers as well as historic sites related to the Indian independence movement. The landscape of Pakistan is made up of rugged mountains, fertile plains, and sandy deserts. Some of the popular mountain ranges in the country include the Himalaya and Karakoram ranges which are home to many famous glaciers such as Baltoro and Biafo. Other significant mountain ranges in Pakistan include Hindukush, Nanga Parbat, and the Sulaiman Range. The Indus Plains, which are located in the northern and eastern parts of Pakistan, are among the most fertile regions in the country. The alluvial soils here are ideal for agriculture, and this region is also home to some of Pakistan’s major cities such as Lahore, Faisalabad, and Multan. The Thar Desert, which is located in the southeastern part of Pakistan, is one of the largest deserts in Asia. This arid region experiences very little rainfall and has a hot and dry climate. Nevertheless, the Thar Desert is home to a variety of plant and animal life. Pakistan’s coastlines include the Arabian Sea and the Indian Ocean, which are popular tourist destinations for surfers and other water sports enthusiasts. The coastal areas of Pakistan also have a wide range of marine life that is perfect for snorkeling and scuba diving. Pakistan's economy is the 24th largest in the world in terms of purchasing power parity (PPP), and the 43rd largest in terms of nominal gross domestic product. Pakistan has a population of over 207 million (the world's 6th-most populous), giving it a nominal GDP per capita of $1,126, which ranks 147th in the world, and a PPP GDP per capita of $4,103, which ranks 132nd in the world. However, Pakistan's economy is the 47th-largest in the world in terms of nominal GDP with $304 billion (2018), and is therefore only about one-third the size of Italy's economy and about one-fourth the size of Spain's economy. The country is classified as a lower-middle-income economy by the World Bank and an emerging market economy by the IMF. Pakistan's service sector accounts for approximately 53% of GDP, while agriculture and industry account for about 23% and 24% respectively. Significant barriers to growth include frequent power cuts, corruption, poor infrastructure, and the Afghan War. The country is not self-sufficient in food production; a large portion of its grain and protein comes from imports. Pakistan's exports are around $24 billion (18th largest in the world), but it has a large trade deficit, which stands at around $32 billion (17th largest). Around 80% of Pakistan's imports are supplied by its cotton, textiles, apparel, and leather industries while crude oil, machinery, and chemicals account for the bulk of Pakistan's exports. The current government is investing significantly in the country's infrastructure. Lahore and Karachi are urban centers that feature modern cityscapes including shopping districts, international restaurant chains, fashion boutiques, and other consumer goods. Islamabad is the country's capital, and also its third-largest city. Agriculture in Pakistan is the backbone of its economy. It contributes about 25% to the country’s GDP and employs more than 43% workforce of the population. Major agro-based industries such as textiles, food processing, leather products, and pharmaceuticals also rely on agricultural raw materials for production. The country has a huge potential for agricultural development due to its vast land resources, varied climatic conditions, and large water endowment. However, the sector is facing various challenges such as declining soil fertility, water scarcity, limited use of technology, and low productivity. The government is taking various measures to promote agricultural growth in the country. These include initiatives to enhance mechanization, modernize irrigation infrastructure, expand high-yielding crop varieties and promote the use of bio-fertilizers and pesticides. Furthermore, efforts are being made to encourage investments in value addition activities such as food processing to increase the sector’s competitiveness at domestic and international levels. Overall, I believe that with improved policies and modern technologies, the agriculture sector in Pakistan has the potential to become a major contributor to the country’s economic growth. Agriculture is one of the key pillars of Pakistan's economy, contributing about 25% to its GDP and employing more than 43% of its workforce. Despite having vast land resources, varied climatic conditions, and a large water endowment, the sector is facing various challenges, such as declining soil fertility, water scarcity, limited use of technology, and low productivity. The government is taking various measures to promote agricultural growth in Pakistan. These include initiatives to enhance mechanization, modernize irrigation infrastructure, expand high-yielding crop varieties, and promote the use of bio-fertilizers and pesticides. Furthermore, efforts are being made to encourage investments in value addition activities such as food processing to increase the sector's competitiveness at domestic and international levels. Pakistan is one of the most populated countries in the world, with a total population of approximately 184 million. There are many different ethnic and religious groups, which have led to some cultural and political tension within the country. However, as Pakistan becomes more economically prosperous, these differences can be overcome. The dominant ethnicity in Pakistan is Punjabi, followed by Pashtun, Sindhi, Saraiki, and Muhajir. The main religions are Islam (96%), Hinduism (2%), Christianity (1%), and Sikhism (0.6%). Pakistan has a young population, with a median age of just 23 years. This presents both challenges and opportunities. With a high proportion of young people, Pakistan is well-placed to benefit from a strong and growing workforce. However, this also puts pressure on the country’s education system and the job market. Overall, Pakistan has a diverse ethnic mix and rich cultural heritage that needs to be preserved and celebrated. Despite some political problems in recent years, Pakistani society is vibrant and growing rapidly. The country has a lot of potentials and is well-positioned to take advantage of it. Pakistan is an Islamic country and the majority of Pakistanis are Muslim. Islam is the official religion of Pakistan, and about 95% of the population practices it. Other religious minorities include Christians, Hindus, Sikhs, and Buddhists. There is a significant amount of religious diversity within Pakistan. Sunni Muslims make up the largest group, followed by Shia Muslims. Sufism, a more mystical form of Islam, is also practiced. Christians make up the largest religious minority, and most are Catholics or Protestants. Hindus make up the second-largest religious minority, and most practice Hinduism or Sikhism. Pakistan is a very diverse country, and this is reflected in its religious landscape. While there has been some tension in the past, religious minorities generally enjoy the freedom of religion and worship. However, it is important to remember that Pakistan's laws are based on Sharia law, which can be a barrier for those who practice other religions. While most people in Pakistan are Muslims, there are also a number of other religious minorities that include Hindus, Sikhs, Christians, Parsis and Buddhists. Many of these groups have existed in Pakistan since ancient times, though their numbers have been declining due to discriminatory policies and persecution. In recent years, there has been an increase in religious violence and intolerance, which has led to the further displacement and marginalization of religious minorities. Despite the challenges faced by religious minorities, Pakistan remains a culturally diverse and fascinating country with a rich history and heritage. From its stunning natural beauty to its vibrant cities, Pakistan offers something for everyone. And with its increasing tourism industry, more and more people are discovering all that this fascinating country has to offer. Pakistan is a country located in southern Asia. The region now straddling the border of present-day Pakistan and Afghanistan is one of the most torn regions of the world. The region has seen the arrival and departure of a number of civilizations, through invasions and migrations: Alexander’s period, the January Uprising of 1857, the Partition of India and Pakistan in 1947, followed by the arrival of refugees from pre-partitioned India. Pakistan’s culture is rich and diverse, reflecting its long history as a melting pot of empires and religions. The country has strong traditions in music, poetry and dance, which have taken root in the region over centuries. Pakistan’s music incorporates elements of Central Asian, Persian, Turkic and Indian classical music. The country is home to several types of folk music, as well as popular styles that have evolved in recent years. Pakistan’s poetry is also rich and diverse, with poets writing in a variety of different styles and genres. In dance, Pakistan has a rich tradition of folk dances, including the bhangra and giddha, which are performed at festivals and other celebrations.

Agricultural markets Pakistan

Ahmadpur East Market

Arifwala Market

Bahawalpur Market

Bhakkar Market

Bhalwal Market

Burewala Market

Chak Jhumra Market

Chichawatni Market

Chiniot Market

Christian Market

Chunian Market

Daska Market

Dera Ghazi Khan Market

Dunyapur Market

Faisalabad Market

Fatehpur Market

Fort Abbas Market

Gujar Khan Market

Gujranwala Market

Gujrat Market

Haroonabad Market

Hasilpur Market

Haveli Lakha Market

Hujra Shah Muqeem Market

Jahanian Market

Jalalpur Jattan Market

Jalalpur Pirwala Market

Jampur Market

Jaranwala Market

Jhelum Market

Kabirwala Market

Kahror Pakka Market

Kalur Kot Market

Kamalia Market

Kanganpur Market

Khanewal Market

Khanpur Market

Khudian Market

Kot Addu Market

Kot Moman Market

Lahore Market

Lala Musa Market

Layyah Market

Liaquatpur Market

Lodhran Market

Mailsi Market

Mamu Kanjan Market

Mandi Bahauddin Market

Mianwali Market

Minchinabad Market

Multan Market

Muzaffargarh Market

Okara Market

Pakpattan Market

Pasrur Market

Patoki Market

Peshawar Wholesale Market

Phool Nagar Market

Piplan Market

Pir Mahal Market

Qadirpurrawan Market

Rahimyar Khan Market

Rajanpur Market

Rawalpindi Market

Renala Khurd Market

Sadiqabad Market

Samundri Market

Sarai Alamgir Market

Shorkot Market

Shujabad Market

Sialkot Market

Tandlianwala Market

Taunsa Sharif Market

Vehari Market

Warburton Market


Agricultural advertisements in Pakistan, buy and sell classified ads

Pea from Pakistan, export, best prices

2.5 USD

kashmir muzafarabad for sale

1.9 USD

Kashmir muzafarabad for sell

1.0 USD

Red onions for sell

180.0 PKR

Potatoes Seeds

1.2 PKR

Fresh olives from Kashmir Muzaffarabad

4.0 PKR

Agricultural companies in Pakistan

De Oro Bakers

College Road Islamabad F7 Markaz

Dominos Pizza Pakistan

Plot #124-125,Sector 15,Korangi Industrial Area

Emerale Enterprises

517, Landmark Plaza, Gulberg

Engro Foods Ltd

Clifton

FAZAL AND SONS

Sarwar plaza block b shop no 10 hashtnagre phatak

Faisal Feeds

6-KM Old Duniya Pur Road

Farmers Cheese Making

Lahore

Flaxen International

Chemi Center, Virjee Street

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