Agriculture and farming in Laos

Laos

Number of agricultural advertisements in Laos:1 ads
Number of agricultural events in Laos:0 events
Number of agricultural companies in Laos:6 companies



Agriculture in Laos

Laos is a landlocked country in Southeast Asia, bordered by Myanmar (formerly Burma) to the northwest, China to the northeast, Vietnam to the east, Cambodia to the southeast, and Thailand to the west. Slightly larger than Utah, Laos is one of the world's only Communist states. It has been ruled by the Lao People's Revolutionary Party (LPRP) since 1975. Laos is a poor, agricultural country with a largely rural population. Rice is the staple crop, and Laos is one of the world's leading exporters of coffee. Timber, hydropower, and tin mining are also important to the economy. Tourism has become an increasingly important source of revenue in recent years. The Lao government officially recognizes 67 ethnic groups, which are further subdivided into more than 80 subgroups. The largest ethnic group is the Lao Loum, who make up about 55 percent of the population. Other significant groups include the Hmong (Miao), Yao (Mien), Khmu, and Akha. Ethnic tension and conflict have been rare in Laos, but there have been sporadic outbreaks of violence between the Hmong and the Lao government. Laos is a Buddhist country, and Theravada Buddhism is the predominant religion. Animism, however, is still practiced by many rural people. The official language of Laos is Lao, a tonal language of the Tai family. French, the language of Laos' colonial past, is still spoken by some older people and is used in government and commerce. English is also spoken by many educated people. The capital of Laos is Vientiane, located in the northwest corner of the country on the Mekong River. Other major cities include Luang Prabang, Savannakhet, and Pakse. Laos is a landlocked country in Southeast Asia, bordered by Myanmar (Burma) to the northwest, Vietnam to the east, Cambodia to the south, and Thailand to the west. It covers an area of 236,000 square kilometers (91,400 square miles), making it slightly larger than Iceland and slightly smaller than New Mexico. Laos' landscape is mostly mountainous, with the Mekong River running through the country. Laos has a tropical climate, with two distinct seasons: the rainy season (May-October) and the dry season (November-April). The average temperature is 27°C (81°F), although it can be cooler in the mountains. The Lao people are the majority ethnic group in Laos, making up about 60% of the population. Other ethnic groups include the Hmong (18%), Khmer (9%), and Vietnamese (5%). Buddhism is the main religion in Laos, with about 70% of the population following this faith. Laos is a developing country and is one of the least developed countries in Southeast Asia. It has a GDP per capita of US$1,200 (2017), which is lower than that of its neighbors Thailand (US$6,800) and Vietnam (US$2,700). Laos is a member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the World Trade Organization (WTO). The Lao economy is one of the fastest-growing in Asia, with an annual growth rate of 7.5% in 2016. The country's economic upturn has been driven by foreign investment, particularly from China, and by strong growth in the construction, mining, and tourism sectors. Laos has been working to diversify its economy and reduce its reliance on foreign aid. The government has been encouraging private enterprise and investment and has opened up the country to foreign trade and investment. Laos is a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO) and is working to improve its business environment. The Lao economy is still largely agrarian, with rice being the main crop. The country also produces coffee, tobacco, sugarcane, and rubber. Forestry is another important sector of the economy, with timber exports contributing to GDP growth. Laos has significant reserves of minerals, including gold, copper, and tin. Mining is a significant contributor to GDP growth, and the country is working to attract foreign investment in this sector. The government is also encouraging the development of the tourism sector, which has great potential due to the country's natural beauty and cultural heritage. The Lao government has set a goal of achieving upper-middle-income status by 2025. To achieve this, the government is working to improve the business environment, attract more foreign investment, and develop key industries such as tourism and mining. Laos faces challenges in reducing poverty and promoting economic growth that is inclusive of all citizens. The country also needs to improve its infrastructure and increase access to education and health care. Laos is a landlocked country in Southeast Asia, bordered by Myanmar (formerly Burma) to the northwest, China to the northeast, Vietnam to the east, Cambodia to the south, and Thailand to the west. About three-quarters of the population of Laos live in rural areas and engage in subsistence agriculture. Rice is the staple crop in Laos, with most farmers growing enough to meet their own needs and then selling any surplus. Other common crops include maize, sweet potatoes, cassava, and peanuts. Fruit trees, such as mangoes, bananas, and coconuts, are also grown. Laos has traditionally been an agrarian society, with the vast majority of the population engaged in subsistence agriculture. However, the country is undergoing rapid economic and social change, and the role of agriculture in the economy is changing as well. In recent years, Laos has been increasingly integrated into the global economy, and more commercialized farming practices are being adopted. The government is also encouraging foreign investment in the agricultural sector, to boost economic growth and reduce poverty. In spite of these changes, Laos remains a largely rural country, and agriculture continues to play a significant role in the economy. In 2012, agriculture accounted for around 22% of GDP and employed around 60% of the workforce. The sector is important not only for food security and livelihoods but also for export earnings. Laos is a major producer of coffee, and exports of other agricultural products, such as rubber, tea, and tobacco, are also growing. Laos has great potential for further agricultural development. The country has large tracts of arable land, and the climate is suitable for a range of crops. However, the sector faces a number of challenges, including low productivity, limited infrastructure, and vulnerability to climate change. The government is working to address these challenges through investments in research and extension services, irrigation infrastructure, and rural development programs. Laos is a landlocked country in Southeast Asia, bordered by Myanmar (formerly Burma) and China to the northwest, Vietnam to the east, Cambodia to the south, and Thailand to the west. With a population of over 6 million people, Laos is one of the least densely populated countries in the world. The vast majority of the population is rural, and agricultural activities remain the main source of livelihood for most Laotians. Laos has a young population, with nearly 60% of the population under the age of 25. The majority of the population is ethnic Lao (approximately 68%), with smaller numbers of Hmong, Khmou, Thai, and other ethnic groups. Theravada Buddhism is the dominant religion, with approximately 60% of the population practicing this faith. Laos has a relatively low population density, with an average of only about 27 people per square kilometer (70 people per square mile). The capital city of Vientiane has a population of just over 730,000 people, while the next largest city, Luang Prabang, has a population of just over 140,000. The Lao government has made strides in recent years to improve access to education and health care, particularly in rural areas. However, poverty remains widespread, with an estimated 33% of the population living below the national poverty line. Laos is also one of the least developed countries in the world, ranking142nd out of 188 countries on the United Nations Development Programme's Human Development Index. Laos is a country with a rich and unique religious heritage. The majority of the population follows Theravada Buddhism, but there is also a significant minority of animists and Christians. Theravada Buddhism is the dominant religion in Laos, and it is professed by about 60% of the population. This form of Buddhism emphasizes the importance of the monastic life and personal spiritual development. The Lao Buddhist tradition is also characterized by a strong belief in reincarnation and karma. Christians make up about 2% of the population of Laos, and most of them are Catholic. There is also a small community of Protestants. Animism, which is the belief that everything in the world has a spirit, is still practiced by about a quarter of the Lao population. This animist tradition often coexists with Buddhism and other religions. The religious landscape of Laos is quite diverse, and this diversity is one of the country's many charms. Laos is a country with a rich culture and tradition. The Lao people have a strong sense of family and community, and respect for their elders is an important part of their culture. Laos is also a Buddhist country, and many of the traditions and customs in Laos reflect this religion. One of the most important aspects of Lao culture is respect for elders. The Lao people believe that it is important to show respect for those who are older and wiser than themselves. This respect is shown in many ways, including speaking softly in the presence of elders, not interrupting when they are speaking, and giving them the best seat in the room. Another important aspect of Lao culture is the importance of family. The Lao people believe that family is the foundation of society, and they place a great emphasis on taking care of their loved ones. Lao families are typically large, with many extended family members living together in one household. Buddhism is also a very important part of Lao culture. Laos is a Buddhist country, and many of the traditions and customs in Laos reflect this religion. For example, it is common for Lao people to make offerings to the monks at their local temple, and to participate in religious festivals. Lao culture is also reflected in the arts. The Lao people have a rich tradition of music, dance, and art. Lao craftsmen are known for their beautiful silks and intricate carvings. Lao music is often played on traditional instruments, such as the khene (a type of bamboo flute) and the pi (a type of drum).

Agricultural advertisements in Laos, buy and sell classified ads

White Aromatic Rice, 10kg, Long-Grain Rice, Packing in Woven Sac

4.3 USD

Agricultural companies in Laos

Nar Agricultural Produce

Ban Phonthan

Pacific Company (Laos) Limited

97/5 Shapanthong Road

Lao Fresh Meats

#133/04 Samsenthai Rd., Xieng Yueun Village, Chanthabuly Dist.,

Eravan Trading Sole Company Limited

Unit 23, Hatsayfong District, Vientiane Capital

XP Trading Lao-Chine Co., Ltd

Samsenthai

lucky machinery

punxey h/no 10 vientiane laos

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