Agriculture and farming in Guatemala

Guatemala

Number of agricultural advertisements in Guatemala:13592 ads
Number of agricultural events in Guatemala:0 events
Number of agricultural companies in Guatemala:2410 companies



Agriculture in Guatemala

Guatemala is a country in Central America bordered by Mexico to the north and west, the Pacific Ocean to the southwest, Belize to the northeast, the Caribbean to the east, and Honduras and El Salvador to the southeast. With an area of 108,890 km2 (42,043 sq mi), Guatemala is the most populous country in Central America with over 17 million inhabitants. A representative democracy, Guatemala's unicameral congress has 158 members; these are elected by popular vote from 22 departments or divisions, which serve as the country's first-level administrative divisions. The nation's capital and largest city are Nueva Guatemala de la Asunción, also known as Guatemala City. Guatemala is a founding member of the United Nations, the Organization of American States, the Central American Integration System, and the Central American Security Commission. Guatemala is known for its rich Maya heritage; it is home to the largest concentration of Maya peoples in Mesoamerica, as well as two of the major Maya civilizations, the Maya Kingdom of Tikal and the Post-Classic Maya civilization of Copan. The territory of modern Guatemala once formed the core of the Maya civilization, which extended across Mesoamerica. Most of the country was conquered by the Spanish in the 16th century, becoming part of the viceroyalty of New Spain. Guatemala attained independence in 1821 as part of the Federal Republic of Central America, which dissolved by 1841. From the mid to late 19th century, Guatemala experienced chronic instability and civil strife. Beginning in the early 20th century, it was ruled by a series of dictators backed by the United Fruit Company and the United States government. In 1944, authoritarian leader Jorge Ubico was overthrown by a pro-democratic military coup, initiating a decade-long revolution that led to sweeping social and economic reforms. A U.S.-backed military coup in 1954 ended the revolution and installed a dictatorship. The 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis occurred as Fidel Castro's regime in Cuba attempted to install nuclear missiles in Guatemala in response to the Bay of Pigs Invasion. The United States began funding anti-guerrilla forces in the country, leading to decades of civil war that culminated in the Guatemalan Genocide of 1981–82, in which an estimated 200,000 people were killed or disappeared. The conflict ended with a peace agreement between the government and leftist guerrillas, leading to the formation of multiparty democracy in Guatemala. In the late 20th century, Guatemala had one of Latin America's fastest-growing economies, though it was devastated by natural disasters such as Hurricane Mitch in 1998. Since then, it has made great strides toward democracy, peace, and development. Guatemala is a country with a rich and varied landscape. From the mountains of the Sierra Madre to the rainforests of the Petén, there is much to explore in this Central American nation. The Sierra Madre mountain range runs through the western part of Guatemala and is home to some of the country's highest peaks. The most popular destination for hikers and climbers is Volcán Tajumulco, which at 4,220 meters (13,845 feet) is the tallest mountain in Central America. Other volcanoes in Guatemala include Pacaya, Acatenango, and Fuego. The Petén region of Guatemala is home to some of the world's largest rainforests. This region is also home to the ancient Maya city of Tikal, which was one of the most important political and economic centers of its time. Today, Tikal is a popular tourist destination and UNESCO World Heritage Site. Guatemala's landscape also includes a number of lakes and rivers. Lake Atitlán is one of the country's most popular tourist destinations, due to its stunning views and clear waters. The lake is surrounded by a number of volcanoes, including Volcán Atitlán, which is active. The Guatemalan economy is one of the most vibrant and rapidly growing in Central America. Despite widespread poverty, the country has made great strides in recent years in terms of economic development. The tourism industry is a major contributor to the economy, with the country attracting nearly 2 million visitors each year. Guatemala is also a major exporter of coffee, sugar, and bananas. remittances from Guatemalans living abroad also play a significant role in the economy, accounting for about 10% of GDP. The government has been working to attract foreign investment and promote economic growth through initiatives such as the Northern Triangle Free Trade Agreement. The Guatemalan economy is expected to continue to grow in the coming years, with the country's GDP expected to reach $60 billion by 2020. Through continued economic development and reforms, Guatemala has the potential to become a major force in the global economy. Guatemala is a country with a rich agricultural heritage. The country's diverse climate and the topography create the perfect conditions for growing a wide variety of crops. Agriculture is one of the mainstay industries in Guatemala, accounting for over 12% of the country's GDP. The majority of Guatemala's farmland is devoted to subsistence agriculture, with crops such as corn, beans, rice, and wheat being grown to feed the country's largely rural population. Commercial agriculture is also an important part of the Guatemalan economy, with coffee, sugarcane, bananas, and flowers being among the most valuable export crops. In recent years, Guatemala has been working to expand its agricultural sector and increase the production of high-value crops. The country has also been investing in agricultural research and development, in an effort to improve yields and create new varieties of crops that are better suited to the country's climate and soils. With its rich agricultural heritage and potential, Guatemala is poised to become a major player in the global food market. The country's farmers and agronomists are working hard to make this a reality, and with continued investment and support, they are sure to succeed. As of 2018, the total population of Guatemala was estimated to be 16,582,469 - an increase of more than 2 million since 2010. The majority of the population (61%) is under the age of 30, with 29% aged 14 or younger and 32% aged 30-44. The median age is 22.8 years old. The population is relatively evenly split between males and females, with 50.4% of the population being male and 49.6% being female. The majority of the population (86%) is of mixed Maya-Spanish heritage, while 9% are of pure Maya heritage and 5% are of pure Spanish heritage. The indigenous Maya make up the largest ethnic group in Guatemala, accounting for around 40% of the total population. Guatemala is a predominantly Catholic country, with around 60% of the population identifying as Catholic. Protestantism is the second-largest religion, with around 30% of the population identifying as Protestant. There is a small minority of other religions, including Islam and Judaism. The official language of Guatemala is Spanish, although around 40% of the population also speaks an indigenous language, such as Maya Quiché or Maya Mam. English is also spoken by a small minority of the population. Guatemala has a relatively young population, with 29% of the population aged 14 or younger and 32% aged 30-44. The median age is 22.8 years old. The life expectancy in Guatemala is 72.1 years, slightly lower than the global average of 72.6 years. The infant mortality rate in Guatemala is 27.6 per 1,000 live births, which is higher than the global average of 24.2 per 1,000 live births. The maternal mortality rate in Guatemala is 113 per 100,000 live births, which is also higher than the global average of 211 per 100,000 live births. The total fertility rate in Guatemala is 2.4 children per woman, which is lower than the global average of 2.5 children per woman. The under-5 mortality rate in Guatemala is 33.4 per 1,000 live births, which is higher than the global average of 32.2 per 1,000 live births. The literacy rate in Guatemala is around 86%, slightly higher than the global average of 84%. Guatemala is a relatively young country, with a median age of 22.8 years. The population is evenly split between males and females, with 50.4% of the population being male and 49.6% being female. The majority of the population (61%) is under the age of 30, while 29% are aged 14 or younger and 32% are aged 30-44. The life expectancy in Guatemala is 72.1 years, slightly lower than the global average of 72.6 years. The infant mortality rate in Guatemala is 27.6 per 1,000 live births, which is higher than the global average of 24.2 per 1,000 live births. The maternal mortality rate in Guatemala is 113 per 100,000 live births, which is also higher than the global average of 211 per 100,000 live births. The total fertility rate in Guatemala is 2.4 children per woman, which is lower than the global average of 2.5 children per woman. The under-5 mortality rate in Guatemala is 33.4 per 1,000 live births, which is higher than the global average of 32.2 per 1,000 live births. The literacy rate in Guatemala is around 86%, slightly higher than the global average of 84%. Guatemala is a country with a young population and a high birth rate. The majority of the population is of mixed Maya-Spanish heritage, while 9% are of pure Maya heritage and 5% are of pure Spanish heritage. The indigenous Maya make up the largest ethnic group in Guatemala, accounting for around 40% of the total population. Guatemala is a predominantly Catholic country, with around 60% of the population identifying as Catholic. Protestantism is the second-largest religion, with around 30% of the population identifying as Protestant. There is a small minority of other religions, including Islam and Judaism. The official language of Guatemala is Spanish, although around 40% of the population also speaks an indigenous language, such as Maya Quiché or Maya Mam. English is also spoken by a small minority of the population. Guatemala has a relatively young population, with 29% of the population aged 14 or younger and 32% aged 30-44. The median age is 22.8 years old. The life expectancy in Guatemala is 72.1 years, slightly lower than the global average of 72.6 years. The infant mortality rate in Guatemala is 27.6 per 1,000 live births, which is higher than the global average of 24.2 per 1,000 live births. The maternal mortality rate in Guatemala is 113 per 100,000 live births, which is also higher than the global average of 211 per 100,000 live births. Guatemala is a land steeped in history and culture. The Maya people have inhabited the region for thousands of years, and their influence can still be seen in Guatemalan art, architecture, and customs. Spanish colonization brought new elements to the country's culture, and today Guatemala is a vibrant melting pot of Maya and European traditions. Guatemala is famous for its traditional textiles, which are colorful and often intricately patterned. Maya women still wear handwoven skirts and blouses in their everyday lives, and the fabrics are also used to make clothing for special occasions. Traditional Guatemalan dress is very colorful, and it is not unusual to see people wearing a mix of patterns and colors. Maya culture is also evident in Guatemalan cuisine, which is based on maize, beans, and chili peppers. Tamales (maize dough wrapped in leaves and steamed) and pupusas (stuffed maize cakes) are both popular dishes, and you can find them being sold by street vendors all over the country. Guatemalan food is usually quite spicy, so be prepared for some heat! Music is an important part of Guatemalan culture, and you will likely hear a mix of traditional Maya music, Spanish folk tunes, and popular songs on the radio wherever you go. Marimba bands are particularly popular, and you can often see them performing in public squares or at special events. If you're interested in learning more about Guatemalan culture, there are a few excellent museums in the capital city of Guatemala City. The Popol Vuh Museum has a great collection of Maya artifacts, and the Ixchel Museum of Indigenous Textiles and Clothing is also well worth a visit.

Agricultural advertisements in Guatemala, buy and sell classified ads

Heno de veza y avena

1090.0 GTQ

Grada de discos Razol

354545.0 GTQ

3 Novillas preñadas

8090.0 GTQ

Becerro terreño

18181.0 GTQ

Grada de discos Tractomotor

29090.0 GTQ

Tractor New Holland TM155

300000.0 GTQ

Algarroba troceada

4363.0 GTQ

Corderas y sementales merino fleischschaf

6818.0 GTQ

Agricultural companies in Guatemala

NFD

Guatemala zona 13

Alpromasa

Gran Plaza , Puerta parada

Agropecuaria Atitlan SA

Diagonal 6 10-01 zona 10. Oficina 1002-B

DESINCAL DE CENTROAMERICA

AVE DE LAS AMERICAS 20-12 ZONA 13

MP International Trading

km 16.5 Carretera al Salvador

Deposito El Caribe

21 c 2-10 z 1

Distribuidora Sources

6av. 7-14 zona1

EXPORTADORA PRADERA VERDE,

Tiquisate

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